It's Not Over. We Won't Give In

In the days ahead, Christians will be pressured to approve and celebrate homosexuality and same-sex marriage. We will be threatened if we do not celebrate their sin. We will be ridiculed in order to silence us. 

We're already being told that the issue is now over and it’s time for us to move on.

That's exactly the message posted last Friday at time.com in an article entitled, “This Is the Time to Move Past the God vs. Gays Debate":

“Friday’s historic Supreme Court ruling in favor of marriage equality presents all of us with an opportunity to hit the reset button. The marriage question has cast its shadow over American discourse for the past several years, and now it’s time to move beyond the God v. Gays stalemate.

“No doubt, there will continue to be some grumblings, both quiet and shrill, about the decision, mostly from religious people. After all, 50% of Americans believe homosexuality is a sin, according to a September Pew poll. And no doubt there will also be some grumblings, strangely enough, from some gay activists, many of whom have made a career out of finding homophobia everywhere.

“But grumblings or not, gay marriage is now the law of the land. And all of us—right and left, gay and straight, religious and agnostic—need to take a moment to regroup and refocus. From this day on, we need to behave differently toward one another.

“Since Christians are under an extreme obligation from their founder to take the lead on reconciliation, I think they should be the ones to set the example here. That means, whatever their private theological convictions on the matter, they need to respect the law and find ways to honor and even celebrate their gay neighbors’ happiness. . . .

“If Christians can’t find the humility to re-evaluate their most cherished beliefs about sexuality, then at the very least they should err on the side of charity and quietly resign themselves to the fact that marriage equality is here to stay. . . .

“Those who are happy with the decision should take a moment and celebrate. Those who are angry about it should take a moment and question their convictions to decide how best to proceed in a way that respects the law. But then we should move on. It’s about time.”

But for Christians, it’s not over. We can’t and won’t move on.

Our convictions aren't determined by who wins elections, what public opinion polls say, what five justices or even nine justices decree, or how the government moves to assert its secularism on us.

Our convictions are determined by the unchanging Word of God.

It can’t be over because we are not arrogant enough to disregard God’s Word and create a new morality for a new day.

We are humble enough to be bound by Scripture.

So, it's not over. It will never be over until Jesus returns. And we won't give in.